Under the Mango Tree

Surrender is a beautiful albeit terrifying thing in life.  I cannot speak for anybody but myself but I have spent the larger part of my adult life living under the delusion/illusion that I have had control over my life.  Over where I lived, how I lived, my marriage my family, even my own body.  The illusion that we have any control over what happens in life is a difficult thing to let go of.  But once I surrendered and realized that I never really had any control in the first place (aside from how I respond) a whole new world opened up to me.  I feel strongly that I spent my first semester here in Ghana learning that lesson.

As such I returned for my final semester of college to the University of Ghana and this beautiful country with as few expectations as possible.  I knew I was here not only to experience the culture of this country but to finish out my degree in Women’s Studies. But that is it. I had no real idea what classes I was going to take (I have finished all of my major requirements). I figured it would all work out. I did not know what experiences I would have, so decided to go with the flow. Or how it all was going to play out. Kind of fly by the seat of my pants mentality.  If any of you know me this is most definitely not how the old Theresa operated by the way.  If you recall though, that girl is finished.

Marianne Williamson once said, “The moment of surrender is not when life is over.  It’s when it begins”. What a beautiful sentiment that is and I feel like it is true in my life. I spent last semester surrendering, and with no preconceived notions of how it would look I find that as this semester is unfolding, a whole new life is beginning for me.

Since I have been back in Ghana I find myself regularly pinching myself to see if what I am really experiencing is actually happening to me. For example, the international program that I am a part of took a trip to Northern Ghana. Part of that trip was the option to go on a Safari. (Is that really an option?!) I was not about to miss this once in a lifetime chance so as a result I found myself not only seeing antelope, monkeys, baboons, warthogs and mongoose and all kinds of wildlife but also standing in the Saharan bush at a watering hole with a herd of bull elephants standing right across from me…… Me! Theresa, who grew up in tiny Camino California, standing closer to crocodiles than I cared to (there was also a park ranger with a very big gun behind me), watching elephants getting a drink and splashing mud on themselves. Hands down the coolest thing I have ever done!

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After that trip though it was time to get back to school and the business of actually “studying abroad”. I have that in quotes because this entire experience is about so much more than studying for my degree in my major. Anyway, I am really excited because I have found a way to take my passion for fiber arts and make studying and teaching that a big part of my research and degree, both in my service learning class and an Independent Study class that I am designing here with a professor in the Social Work Department.  Both of which seem to be kind morphing into my post college career. Again, in letting go of what I thought I should do (get a marketable degree), what I love seems to be bubbling up right before me.  Cool! And yet another pinch myself experience.

And in the spirit of trying on new things I also am taking a Traditional African Dance class, which, to be honest, I was a bit nervous about but so far am really enjoying it. I join about 90 other students, most of whom are at least half my age and I sweat like crazy and do my best to get my middle-aged body to move in ways it is most definitely unaccustomed to moving.  I joked with my 21-year-old son that I was worried about throwing my back out and how embarrassing it would be.  He replied, “That’s the fun part! I am not so sure about that but I get his sentiment and appreciate it.

One of my most pleasant surprises this semester however, has been the seperewa class that I have begun.  I had no idea what a seperewa even was a few weeks ago. It is a stringed, harp like instrument.  I have never played a musical instrument before and up to this point in my life have been convinced that I do not have a musical bone in my body. I was worried I had bitten off more than I could chew.  My program director here in Ghana assured me that every student that has taken the class had really enjoyed it.  So, I jumped on in.  I met my instructor this week.  His name is Osei Korankye and he is evidently quite famous in the seperewa world.  Here is a link to see him and the seperewa in action should you be curious.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=36EPLeJfHMI

He is a kind and lovely man who teaches classes one-on-one.  The first day we met there was a very loud drumming and dancing class next to his studio so we took our chairs and seperewas out behind the building and sat under the shade of a beautiful giant mango tree.  The morning was still a bit cool (for Ghana during the dry season that is) and the breeze was gently blowing. Professor Korankye proceeded to tell me the history of the seperewa which has been around in the Ashanti kingdom since the 1700’s, and the story of how his grandfather taught him to play.  As he was talking he continued to gently strum on his seperewa and encouraged me to mimic his playing. By the end of the session I was playing scales like I knew what I was doing and I had become thoroughly enchanted with the instrument.  I was quite taken aback at how it unfolded so naturally and organically.  I think it is a testament to his unique teaching style. Who would have thought, certainly not me, that I would find my musical self, sitting under the mango tree?

Life is just full of surprises if you are willing to be open to them. I can’t wait to see what is next 🙂

Peace to you,

Theresa

2 thoughts on “Under the Mango Tree

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